Newcastle Surgical Training Centre uses Osso VR for surgeon development

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California-based medical software and training company Osso VR has expanded into the European market with the deployment of its technology in Newcastle Surgical Training Centre to prepare surgeons for difficult procedures.

Newcastle Surgical Training Centre delivers around 300 surgical courses each year. Director of robotic surgery, Naeem Soomro, said the group believes virtual and augmented reality (VR/AR) and realistic simulation of the kind that Osso VR provides will “become a significant component of surgical training in the future”.

Osso VR has seen success across the US in top residency programmes looking to increase access to hands-on training and assessment opportunities for surgical trainees.

The company has also attracted top orthopedic medical device companies. It released a VR training module for Smith & Nephew’s Navio robotics device last month.

In scientifically validating the platform, preliminary study results have shown an Osso VR-trained group performed 230 percent better than a control group, trained traditionally.

“Surgical skill is directly correlated with patient outcomes, yet we don’t currently measure the proficiency of our surgical care providers.”

Justin Barad, chief executive officer and co-founder of Osso VR

Justin Barad, chief executive officer and co-founder of Osso VR, said: “Surgical skill is directly correlated with patient outcomes, yet we don’t currently measure the proficiency of our surgical care providers. Ideally we can identify improvement areas and then intervene with targeted simulation in order to provide higher quality and standardised care around the globe.”

“Immersive technologies like VR have the proven ability to address the challenges presented by the current the accelerating pace of innovation. We are thrilled to be working globally with more hospitals and device companies that understand that the biggest problem we’re facing today is not what we are doing for our patients, but how we are doing it.”

“We see VR as an integral cog in the development and maintenance of surgical skills acquisition in healthcare education,” said Paul Fearon, training programme director in orthopaedics in Newcastle. “It interfaces with high fidelity simulation, allowing team-based learning with the ultimate goal of improving patient safety.”

Image Credits: Osso VR