EON Reality and partners develop domestic violence training simulation

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Virtual and augmented (VR/AR) knowledge transfer specialist EON Reality has partnered with Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences and UN Women Moldova to develop a proof of concept training simulation for police officers who deal with cases of domestic violence.

Quick read

➨ EON Reality, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences and UN Women Moldova partner

➨ The partners have developed a proof of concept training simulation for police officers who deal with cases of domestic violence

➨ A series of consultations and workshops were used to identify and test positive and negative behaviour in police officers, social workers and other participants

➨ UN Women Moldova is looking to work with police departments both in its own country and around the world

The story

The partners have been working together for the past year on using VR and AR technologies to reduce gender-based violence.

A series of consultations and workshops have been used to identify and test positive and behaviour in police officers, social workers and other participants, with a view to simulating them in an immersive environment.

Moldova’s general police inspectorate, various ministries, the Moldovan Association of ICT Companies and several international organisations working in the field of women’s rights have all participated in the consultations and workshops.

EON Reality, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences and UN Women Moldova tested several settings and responses for direct translation into VR and AR, including working with shelters for victims of domestic violence, being the first responder to a domestic violence call, talking to perpetrators of domestic violence, and issuing restraining orders.

An endlessly revisable training simulation

Their resulting proof of concept has been developed for use in an HMD such as the Oculus Rift or HTC Vive.

EON Reality said the immersive sessions provide both a safe space and endlessly revisable training simulation for police officers to practice working in distressing, painful and potentially dangerous situations.

The interactive and recordable nature of this training also allows officers to receive feedback on the decisions they make within these virtual training environments, so they have the experience to act faster, smarter and with more empathy when faced with the situation in real life.

The collaboration continues the work that UN Women Moldova has done since 2015.

Using VR and AR technology to expand its efforts, UN Women Moldova is looking to work with police departments both in its own country and around the world to change the psychological patterns and practices of officers.

‘A training approach based on concrete situations’

Bjorn Bakken, a professor at Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, commented: “This is very innovative. It’s a powerful training method that provides you an opportunity to learn by doing. Once you have made the VR application, it can be distributed to any number of users as long as they have a phone, which makes it very cost effective.”

Ghenadie Neamţu, chief of the public security department in the general police inspectorate, enthused: “A training approach based on concrete situations will give police officers a better understanding of how they should act.”

Image credit: EON Reality