Mojo Vision_ Eyes-up and hands-free

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Mojo Vision’s top secret augmented reality (AR) project is still very much underwraps, but the California-based startup’s recently revealed 14K PPI Display has been described as “a key building block” of its ‘invisible computing’ platform.

Quick read

➨ Mojo Vision raised $58 million in additional funding earlier this year to continue development of its invisible computing project

➨ The new Mojo 14K PPI Display will enable more seamless, efficient and mobile AR experiences, and is a key building block of the invisible computing platform

➨ The 14K PPI Display is the size of a grain of sand and is nearly invisible

The story

Mojo Vision raised $58 million in additional funding earlier this year to continue development of its invisible computing project. Google’s Gradient Ventures and Advantech Capital were among the strategic and venture investors that participated in the funding round.

The startup has so far raised more than $108 million, including $50 million+ in November 2018.

The funding is being used to develop invisible computing, a platform “where access to information is instantaneous and unobtrusive, but without phones, tablets or other devices getting in the way”, explains Steve Sinclair, senior vice president of product and marketing at Mojo Vision.

“Mojo Vision is developing AR solutions that provide critical information, yet still allow people to interact with one another more freely. We recently conducted a survey on technology usage and discovered that many of us are too attached to our devices and are struggling with ineffective or counterproductive ‘digital detox’ behaviours.

“The reality is that most of us still need that immediate access to information and have adapted our behaviour to the technology. However, many believe the onus is on tech companies—not consumers—to find a way to make these devices less distracting. This is where Mojo comes in.”

The new Mojo 14K PPI Display will enable more seamless, efficient and mobile AR experiences, and is a key building block of the invisible computing platform, according to Sinclair.

Mojo Vision 14K PPI Display

“It uses MicroLEDs which are brighter than OLED-based pixels, yet require around 10% of the power of LCD-based pixels. With a 1.3µm pixel pitch and a pixel density that’s 300 times greater than current smartphone displays, our 14K PPI Display is the size of a grain of sand and is nearly invisible, making it the world’s smallest and densest dynamic—or moving—content display in the world.”

Developing such a small and dynamic display opens up the possibility of AR becoming a part of our everyday lives, at play and in work. Heavy, tethered headsets and even attractive smart glasses do not offer the decreased distraction that Mojo is attempting to achieve.

Sinclair says: “AR devices on the market today, while technologically powerful and advanced, fail to check the boxes necessary to become mass market consumer products. A successful AR platform will not only offer utility throughout the day, but will also deliver true mobility and social acceptability, all at a reasonable price.”

“If you can’t put on an AR solution in the morning and wear it all day long—if doesn’t look and feel normal— it won’t find traction. The promise of Mojo’s invisible computing is that it can give you access to the right information at the right time, yet still allow you to focus on the world right in front of you without the interruption of today’s screens.”

The future is eyes-up and hands-free

Enterprise stands to benefit from the invisible computing revolution, too.

Sinclair says: “From an enterprise perspective, the industry is starting to see a shift from interest in adoption, to pilot deployments. Gartner estimates that by 2022, 70% of enterprises will be testing AR/VR/XR for larger scale rollouts in their workflows and processes, especially in healthcare, manufacturing, logistics, education, and other fields that have specific needs that are addressed by immersive technology.

He adds: “AR and VR are also gaining traction with those in customer-facing roles, such as guest services and retail, two areas for which invisible computing is ideally suited.”

“Imagine a world where you could be chatting with a customer while simultaneously accessing product options and pricing without having to walk away to find an available screen. With invisible computing, businesses can eliminate the need for devices that interrupt face-to-face conversations, allowing employees to make real human connections. The role of technology in our society is rapidly evolving—becoming one that’s more focused on bringing us closer to the people and the world around us, eyes-up and hands-free.”

Image credits: Mojo Vision

This article originally appeared in Issue 1 of VRWorldTech Magazine