Precision OS upgrades surgeon training platform

Mark manages all of the content for VRWorldTech. To discuss an idea or pitch a story, drop him a line at editor@vrworldtech.com

The Precision OS platform is now capable of delivering even more efficient and effective training, according to its creator

Quick read

➨ The Precision OS surgeon training platform utilises the Oculus Quest and is accredited in Canada for orthopaedic surgery
➨ Multiplayer allows several users in different locations to simultaneously access the same learning module
➨ It could even allow surgeons to remotely collaborate

The story

Canada-based Precision OS, the developer of VR training for surgeons, has added a new ‘multiplayer’ feature to its platform that will allow several users in different locations to simultaneously access the same learning module.

The training platform, which utilises the Oculus Quest and is accredited by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in Canada for orthopaedic surgery, is now capable of delivering even more efficient and effective training, according to its creator.

“Multiplayer is literally and figuratively adding another dimension to our training platform, enabling the type of collaboration and knowledge-share that’s typically only found in a clinical setting,” said Dr Danny Goel, a practicing orthopedic shoulder surgeon and chief executive officer of Precision OS.

He added: “Through technology, we’re now able to assemble multidisciplinary teams for training without anyone having to travel.”

Precision OS cited an example to demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of its platform, with the company recently training more than 300 medical device sales representatives using VR in just 30 minutes.

Multiplayer could even allow surgeons to remotely collaborate with their peers, trainees and key operating room personnel, including device reps, according to Precision OS.

Goel recently told VRWorldTech Magazine that he believes “VR in healthcare is gaining momentum and new applications like ours are proving value to residents, surgeons and medical device companies”.

He said: “One of the biggest hurdles was the fact that it was computer-based in the past, so it was tethered and much more cumbersome. Now, we’ve made a big transition to mobile VR, which speaks to the time, convenience and efficiency that everybody is so accustomed to now.”

Image: Precision OS