Igloo Vision secures £435,000 in new funding

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The funding will be used to progress Igloo Vision’s product development roadmap, which will include application and content integration and improving ease of use

Quick read

➨ The £435,000 in funding was recently secured under a UK government investment scheme for enterprise
➨ Since Igloo Vision secured £1 million of investment last year, the company has increased from 50 to 80 employees worldwide, and opened brand-new demo centres in New York City and London
➨ Igloo Immersive Workspace, which can transform any meeting room or collaboration space to house a wraparound 360° screen powered by Igloo’s software, is ready to be deployed

The story

UK-based Igloo Vision is developing its Immersive Workplace solution and other products with £435,000 in new funding, in anticipation of a staggered easing of lockdown measures implemented in response to the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic.

Igloo Immersive Workspace, which can transform any meeting room or collaboration space to house a wraparound 360° screen powered by Igloo’s software, is the company’s latest innovation and is ready to be deployed, according to Colin Yellowley, co-founder and managing director of Igloo Vision.

The £435,000 in funding recently secured under a UK government investment scheme for enterprise will be used to further progress its product development roadmap, which will include application and content integration, improving ease of use, expanding content creation and management, and accommodating newer display technologies.

Yellowley said: “Right now, we’re working on productising virtual meeting rooms/lecture theatres with the use of Igloo Shared VR technology. If you don’t mind watching a 40 second video [below], you can get a look here at what a simple Zoom video call can look like in an Igloo cylinder. A presenter can still have the feeling of speaking to a room full of people, judge reactions, and still have access to slides, presentations, whiteboards that people in the call can be connected with, etc.”

“Once lockdown measures ease,” Yellowley continued, “it’s our thinking we won’t see people flood back into the workplace, and we’ll instead see people return in dribs and drabs, while others realise it makes more sense for them to work remotely and travel less.”

“Here, new customers will find the immersive workspace, virtual meeting rooms or lecture theatres to be very useful in connecting a mix of employees working in the office and still working remotely so they can collaborate far more effectively than they did over a simple video call.”

Securing £435,000 in funding—from new investor, London-headquartered financial services firm and asset manager Mariana UFP, and existing partners—at such a time of crisis “demonstrates the strength of the Igloo proposition”, focused on designing and delivering immersive 360° VR experiences and solutions for enterprise, chief executive officer Dennis Wright said earlier this week.

Since Igloo Vision secured £1 million of investment last year, the company has increased from 50 to 80 employees worldwide, and opened brand-new demo centres in New York City and London.

“The US is our largest and fastest-growing market, where we work with clients like Accenture, WarnerMedia, Crowe and Cushman & Wakefield. They’re investing strongly in the technology, and they’re interested in the way Igloo helps with visualisations, presentations, collaboration and rich storytelling.”

Colin Yellowley, Igloo Vision

On Igloo Vision’s ambitions in the US, Yellowley said: “Although we’re based in the UK, the US is our largest and fastest-growing market, where we work with clients like Accenture, WarnerMedia, Crowe and Cushman & Wakefield. They’re investing strongly in the technology, and they’re interested in the way Igloo helps with visualisations, presentations, collaboration and rich storytelling.”

“In the UK, with clients like BP and Lanes Group, there’s often a stronger emphasis on simulations and training, where the technology is used to replicate something that’s too expensive or too hazardous to attempt in real life.”

Image: Igloo Vision’s Immersive Workplace solution in action at a conference
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