Rolls-Royce propels customer learning with VR training expansion

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The latest addition to the remote training programme is an instructor-led distance learning course that provides a comprehensive overview of the construction, design and operation of the Rolls-Royce BR725 engine

Quick read

➨ After completion of the two-day VR training course, Rolls-Royce says participants will be able to service the engine and undertake non-routine maintenance
➨ Rolls-Royce’s VR training tool allows anyone to participate in training remotely
➨ The company will provide the necessary VR equipment to participate

The story

Rolls-Royce has expanded its VR remote training programme to offer greater support to its customers as they grapple with adequate servicing and maintenance of its complex technology.

The latest addition to the remote training programme is an instructor-led distance learning course that provides a comprehensive overview of the construction, design and operation of the Rolls-Royce BR725 engine that powers Gulfstream’s current flagship G650 business aircraft family.

After completion of the two-day training course, Rolls-Royce says participants will be able to service the engine and undertake non-routine maintenance.

Rolls-Royce’s VR training tool, launched as part of its ‘IntelligentEngine’ plan to use digital technology to pull together and enhance its wide range of expertise for the benefit of customers, allows anyone to participate in training remotely. Rolls-Royce will also provide the necessary VR equipment.

Andy Robinson, senior vice president for customers and services in the business aviation group at Rolls-Royce, said: “Digitalisation plays a vital role in bringing our IntelligentEngine vision to life: we use it to design, test and maintain our engines. This new immersive live virtual training tool is nothing short of a game-changer—it makes us the leader in technical training.”

The programme allows each student to immerse themselves in an augmented environment full of realistic images, interactive functions and auditory feedback to delve deeper into the engine.

It provides two realistic scenarios—the engine installed on the aircraft in a virtual hangar and the BR725 engine alone. The immersive environment allows users to watch the process steps to get familiar with the respective task, interact with the engine and the tools, and accomplish the task under the constant supervision of the instructor.

“While not intended to completely replace practical training, Rolls-Royce sees the value virtual reality adds for customers, such as higher flexibility and the elimination of the need to ship a full-size training engine.”

Lee Bradshaw, Cox Aviation

Lee Bradshaw, director of technical operations at Cox Aviation, commented: “The new virtual reality maintenance course is a great example of the innovative thinking that is needed to meet the challenges of our ever-changing world.”

“While not intended to completely replace practical training, Rolls-Royce sees the value virtual reality adds for customers, such as higher flexibility and the elimination of the need to ship a full-size training engine.”

Rolls-Royce signed up Qatar Airways as the first participant in its Trent XWB engine maintenance programme last year.

That partnership saw Qatar Airlines engineers receive Rolls-Royce Trent XWB refresher training in a virtual environment.

The Trent XWB is a large engine and must be separated before engineers can transport it for maintenance and repair. Using HTC Vive VR equipment, Qatar Airways engineers were able to train to separate the two parts of the engine in a virtual setting, which the airline said will reduce the complexity and cost associated with working on a real engine.

Main image: The programme allows each student to immerse themselves in an augmented environment full of realistic images, interactive functions and auditory feedback