Oculus for Business - Enterprise-charged VR is here

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The platform is now available for $999, which includes the first year’s subscription to the Oculus for Business software and an enterprise-charged but essentially unchanged Quest

Quick read

➨ The platform is built on Facebook’s enterprise collaboration tool
➨ Users benefit from a kiosk mode that enables admins to launch them into a single experience
➨ It will work easily with mobile device management systems, including MobileIron and VMware Workspace ONE

The story

Oculus for Business is now officially out of beta and generally available—offering its target enterprise market a Quest-based software setup for admin-controlled multi-user experiences, a dedicated app launcher, device management, and no distracting consumer apps.

The platform, which is built on Facebook’s enterprise collaboration tool, Workplace, launched in 2019 on a promise to “simplify enterprise VR through a holistic approach designed especially for large-scale deployments”.

Then the Covid-19 pandemic happened—and now Oculus for Business feels very much like a tool for the times rather than a reshaping of the way enterprise works in the not-too-distant future.

Available for $999, which includes the first year’s subscription to the Oculus for Business software and an enterprise-charged but essentially unchanged Quest, the new platform allows large numbers of headsets to be managed simultaneously, as well as their apps.

Users benefit from a kiosk mode that enables admins to launch them into a single experience. The connection with Facebook Workplace ensures security through ID and account management, with Oculus promising that enterprise users will get the chance to experience planned updates first.

Oculus said the enterprise platform will work easily with mobile device management systems, including MobileIron and VMware Workspace ONE (with more planned), so that users enjoy some comfort in integration with existing workflows.

To ensure that users are not distracted by consumer apps, a dedicated launcher is included, with what Oculus describes as a sleek and comfortable interface.

As ever, enterprise use cases are front and centre of Oculus’s pitch for the new platform. Several examples have been highlighted, including Johnson & Johnson Institute’s surgeon training application with development partner Osso VR and Nestlé Purina Petcare’s focus on remote collaboration and retail planning.

The Oculus Independent Software Vendor programme promises custom enterprise solutions in the future, with more than 400 taking part so far.

One company participating in the programme is InsiteVR, a developer of VR meeting software for architecture, engineering and construction project teams, which has used Oculus Quest to help their clients connect and collaborate across distance.

“Since using Oculus Quest, we’ve seen a surge in interest from clients looking to use VR to help connect their teams working remotely. Quest now accounts for over 50% of our usage and is the only device we consistently see teams using.”

Angel Say, InsiteVR

Angel Say, chief executive officer and co-founder of InsiteVR, told Oculus: “Since using Oculus Quest, we’ve seen a surge in interest from clients looking to use VR to help connect their teams working remotely. Quest now accounts for over 50% of our usage and is the only device we consistently see teams using.”

InsiteVR has also unlocked new opportunities for Stantec, a global design and delivery firm.

Chuck Lounsberry, principal and visual design leader at Stantec, told Oculus: “Designers can move through designs at a personal scale, providing a more immersive experience that helps them identify errors, appraise design decisions, and predict design change impacts.”

Images: Oculus for Business apps and workers in action
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