Augmedics xvision AR headset used in spinal fusion surgery 3

Mark manages all of the content for VRWorldTech. To discuss an idea or pitch a story, drop him a line at editor@vrworldtech.com

Surgeons from Johns Hopkins University have performed a spinal fusion surgery in the US using the Augmedics xvision AR surgical guidance system

Quick read

➨ Xvision was approved for use in the US in December 2019
➨ The headset determines the position of surgical tools, in real time, and a virtual trajectory is then superimposed on the patient’s CT data
➨ Doctors Timothy Witham, Daniel Sciubba and Camilo Molina performed the first spinal fusion surgery using xvision in Boston on 8 June

The story

The xvision AR headset from Augmedics has been used for the first time in a spinal fusion surgery in the US.

Surgeons from Johns Hopkins University performed the posterior lumbar decompression, slipped vertebrae (spondylolisthesis) correction and fusion on 8 June. The AR surgical guidance system from Augmedics, which was approved for use in December 2019, allows surgeons to visualise the 3D spinal anatomy of a patient.

Augmedics says xvision solves two common problems that plague the approximately 1.62 million instrumented spinal procedures that are performed in the US every year.

One is surgeons using a freehand technique to carry out surgery, which results in a number of complications and undesired outcomes, including inaccurate screw positioning that leads to neurological complications and reoperations

Another is existing surgical navigation systems that, despite significantly improving surgical outcomes, are uncomfortable, inefficient, difficult to use, not easy to integrate and distract from patients.

The xvision AR headset consists of a transparent near-eye-display headset and other traditional navigational elements. It determines the position of surgical tools, in real time, and a virtual trajectory is then superimposed on the patient’s CT data.

The 3D navigation data is then projected onto the surgeon’s retina using the headset, allowing them to simultaneously look at the patient and see the navigation data without averting their eyes to a remote screen during the procedure.

Doctors Timothy Witham, Daniel Sciubba and Camilo Molina performed the first spinal fusion surgery using xvision in Boston, Maryland.

“This first case is just the beginning of a revolutionary change to the way surgery is performed by providing surgeons with more control, giving them the information they need, directly within their working field of sight, to instill technological confidence in the surgical workflow, and to help surgeons perform as safely and effectively as possible.”

Nissan Elimelech, Augmedics

Nissan Elimelech, founder and chief executive officer of Augmedics, said: “This first case is just the beginning of a revolutionary change to the way surgery is performed by providing surgeons with more control, giving them the information they need, directly within their working field of sight, to instill technological confidence in the surgical workflow, and to help surgeons perform as safely and effectively as possible.”

“We expect xvision will dramatically improve accuracy, safety, operating efficiencies and patient outcomes in an environment that increasingly can tolerate nothing less.”

Xvision is now available for sale in the US, with headset distribution underway. Augmedics said it plans to explore additional surgical applications for the AR headset beyond spinal surgery.

Main image: The xvision AR headset from Augmedics