Wright’s Blueprint MR used in shoulder arthroplasty procedure 1

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Visualisation tools for surgeons are becoming more widely available and used with the arrival of the Blueprint MR system from medical device maker Wright Medical Group

Quick read

➨ Joaquin Sanchez-Sotelo performed the procedure at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, Minnesota, using Netherlands-headquartered Wright’s Blueprint MR, which provides a 3D view of the patient’s preoperative plan
➨ MR is a new addition to Wright’s Blueprint system and enables a surgeon to maintain a direct view of the surgical site and simultaneously visualise and manipulate a holographic representation of the patient’s native anatomy and preoperative plan
➨ Using hand gestures and voice commands, the surgeon can interact with a robust data set to optimise the position of the 3D holographic models displayed by the MR application

The story

The first shoulder arthroplasty procedure using the Blueprint MR system from medical device maker Wright Medical Group has been performed.

Joaquin Sanchez-Sotelo performed the procedure at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, Minnesota, using Netherlands-headquartered Wright’s Blueprint MR, which provides a 3D view of the patient’s preoperative plan, and Microsoft’s HoloLens.

MR is a new addition to Wright’s Blueprint system and enables a surgeon to maintain a direct view of the surgical site and simultaneously visualise and manipulate a holographic representation of the patient’s native anatomy and preoperative plan.

Using hand gestures and voice commands, the surgeon can interact with a robust data set to optimise the position of the 3D holographic models displayed by the MR application.

MR is a new addition to Wright’s Blueprint system
MR is a new addition to Wright’s Blueprint system

Commenting on his experience with the system, Dr Sanchez-Sotelo said: “I was able to visualise, rotate, and tilt three-dimensional holographic objects right in front of the surgical field. As mixed reality continues to develop, it will provide a very unique, cost-effective tool for execution of our surgical plan.”

Robert Palmisano, president and chief executive officer of Wright, called the procedure “an important milestone for shoulder arthroplasty” that “marks a major step in the evolution of Blueprint mixed reality technology in shoulder surgery”.

He continued: “For the first time in shoulder arthroplasty, surgeons will be able to interact with their 3D preop plan in real-time to more precisely tailor shoulder joint replacement procedures to the unique needs and anatomy of their patients.”

“By integrating other solutions in the future, such as artificial intelligence, case planning optimisation and mixed reality modules for medical education, the Blueprint ecosystem offers an opportunity to significantly reduce variability in the way shoulder arthroplasties are performed, potentially reducing complications and improving overall patient outcomes.”

The use of Blueprint MR follows the release of Medacta’s AR-powered surgical platform for total knee arthroplasty procedures in the US.

NextAR, soon to be deployed for hip, shoulder and spine procedures, too, uses AI and machine learning to make pre-operative CT-based planning and analysis efficient and precise.

Orthopaedic surgery is proving to be fertile ground for innovation within immersive technology, with visualisation fast becoming a vital use case in healthcare.

These developments show that medical device makers are committing significant resources to immersive tech, underlining their belief that VR, AR and MR are tools that can genuinely make medical procedures more efficient and successful.

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Main image: Wright’s Blueprint MR application runs on HoloLens to give surgeons access to a patient’s preoperative plan during surgery