HTC Vive - audience adoption less of a concern for enterprise developers

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Consumer VR developers are more concerned than their enterprise counterparts about limited audience adoption, according to HTC Vive

Quick read

➨ With 27% of 350 surveyed developers highlighting limited audience adoption as the biggest challenge, HTC Vive saw a gap emerge between consumer and enterprise-focused developers
➨ Those building for consumers cited low adoption more frequently than those who developed for enterprise
➨ After low audience adoption, developers are also worried about investment and funding

The story

The biggest challenge VR developers face when building and commercialising their applications is limited audience adoption, according to an HTC Vive survey, although this was less keenly felt among those serving enterprise customers.

With 27% of 350 surveyed developers highlighting limited audience adoption as the biggest challenge, HTC Vive saw a gap emerge between consumer and enterprise-focused developers.

Those building for consumers cited low adoption more frequently than those who developed for enterprise. It was also apparent that developers of tethered headsets seemed more concerned with low audience adoption than those developing for standalone devices, according to HTC Vive.

Lewis Ward, research director for gaming and VR/AR at IDC, reasoned that this gap “may be a product of enterprise VR developers believing that they have more of a built-in audience or that they find that enterprise projects are more readily funded compared with those on the consumer side”.

HTC Vive teamed up with the market intelligence firm IDC to conduct the survey in January, before the outbreak Covid-19, and has released the results in two batches.

The first lot focused on key opportunities and trends for VR developers, and noted an increase in enterprise adoption of VR as the biggest change in immersive technology over the past year.

After low audience adoption, developers are also worried about investment and funding.

HTC Vive highlighted the suggestions of developers that have been successful in finding an audience and investment for their projects, with an achievable and economical plan, finding the right person within an organisation to sell it internally, and spending as much time as possible with the client to help them to understand its potential all integral to success.

Some developers found that the best way to convince potential investors, partners and customers was to use the immersive power of VR to highlight the merits of their work, through free prototypes and demos.

The trials and tribulations of being a VR developer will always come down to adoption and funding, but it’s interesting to hear that those focused on the enterprise market don’t see these as insurmountable problems.

How have you attracted investment and built your customer pipeline? Are there any tips that you can share? Let VRWorldTech know via Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook or editor@vrworldtech.com.

Main image: Christine Sandu / Unsplash