American High School VR learning - Main 1

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American High School students will experience the benefits of social learning in an immersive 3D environment, rather than in isolation, passively on a 2D screen

Quick read

➨ American High School will conduct lessons this month in VictoryXR Campus, a virtual reality-based school built on the Engage communications and events platform
➨ The upgrade is a demonstration project carried out in partnership with semiconductor maker Qualcomm and curriculum developer VictoryXR
➨ Qualcomm is providing consultation and funding for the project through Educate & Elevate

The story

American High School, a provider of online middle and high school-grade courses, is upgrading the digital learning experience of its students using virtual reality.

The online learning provider of courses in the US and internationally will conduct lessons this month in VictoryXR Campus, a virtual reality-based school built on the Engage communications and events platform.

VRWorldTech visited VictorXR Campus last year when it was opened for public tours and found the entire experience to be exactly as you might expect—and incredibly positive.

The upgrade is a demonstration project carried out in partnership with semiconductor maker Qualcomm and curriculum developer VictoryXR, to show the effectiveness of learning in virtual reality and the potential of headsets such as Oculus Quest, Vive Focus and Pico Neo, which all use Qualcomm chips.

Qualcomm is providing consultation and funding for the project through Educate & Elevate, a local charity in Florida dedicated to providing deserving students with virtual learning opportunities.

The partners hope to demonstrate that students in three classes who will begin attending instruction this month with teachers on the VictoryXR campus, will experience the benefits of social learning in an immersive 3D environment, rather than in isolation, passively on a 2D screen.

Not to be ‘confused with “virtual” education’

Steve Grubbs, chief executive officer of VictoryXR, explains: “This should not be confused with ‘virtual’ education, which is generally a 2D experience with students planted firmly in front of a passive screen.”

“What American High School is launching are classes where students and their teacher will gather together in the same VR classroom space and interact as if they were in a physical school building.”

American High School VR learning - Campus class
A VictoryXR Campus class

Students attending VictoryXR campus will be able to handle human organs in biology class, construct molecules in chemistry class, and take field trips together for history class all while learning in immersive ways with 3D objects and interactive environments.

Franz Schmelkes, director of strategy and business at Qualcomm, adds: “Our best hope is that students in our high school—even though they are in different time zones —can experience the power of learning communally. And if the data is correct about significantly improved retention, then American High School students will have a better learning experience in a more social environment, and that’s a win-win for everyone.”

American High School VR learning - Main 2
VictoryXR Campus

American High School founder and chief executive officer Dana Williams comments: “We have been a global leader in online learning for more than a decade and the technology is finally letting us bring everyone together in the same classroom, even if it is a virtual reality classroom.”

“When I saw the movie, Ready Player One, it seemed far off. I had no idea we would be the ones making it a reality in our own campus metaverse.”

VictoryXR is doing a commendable job of promoting the benefits of virtual reality for learning as a tool for education delivered remotely—as above—as well as in person.

The company revealed earlier this month that it is working with Fisk University, HTC Vive and T-Mobile to demonstrate that virtual reality has a place in the classroom and can serve as an alternative to expensive and difficult-to-source equipment.

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Images: VictoryXR

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